Psalm 8

Recently on this blog, I have been publishing some of the psalms found in the Old Testament Book of Psalms. This morning I read the following psalm as part of a devotional I have been reading title, Praying Through the Most Beloved Psalms in 30 Days,” by Dolores Smyth, nationally published faith and parenting writer, and contributor on Crosswalk.com. Here is the psalm for today:

Psalm 8 (NIV)

Lord, our Lord,
    how majestic is your name in all the earth!

You have set your glory
    in the heavens.
Through the praise of children and infants
    you have established a stronghold against your enemies,
    to silence the foe and the avenger.
When I consider your heavens,
    the work of your fingers,
the moon and the stars,
    which you have set in place,
what is mankind that you are mindful of them,
    human beings that you care for them?

You have made them a little lower than the angels
    and crowned them with glory and honor.
You made them rulers over the works of your hands;
    you put everything under their feet:
all flocks and herds,
    and the animals of the wild,
the birds in the sky,
    and the fish in the sea,
    all that swim the paths of the seas.

Lord, our Lord,
    how majestic is your name in all the earth!

BibleProject.com provides both a visual commentary and written commentary on Psalm 8 titled, Ruling the World through Weakness in Psalm 8: What Do Babbling Babies Have to do with Strongholds?” by Cheree Hayes and the Bible Project Team. The visual commentary is available on their website at this link and on YouTube (YouTube video is below):

The written commentary on BibleProject.com opens with the following:

Why would the creator of the universe choose to rule the world through the babbling cries of needy humans? Psalm 8 describes Yahweh as the King of creation who made dependent humans his royal partners. This is unexpected and wonderful news to those who understand their need for God. But it’s offensive to those who want to rule their lives apart from Yahweh. Throughout the Bible, we see people violently oppose God’s strategy for ruling the universe. And this opposition creates a lot of chaos. So Yahweh establishes a stronghold of protection wherever one of his children humbly recognizes their need and calls out to him. Let’s take a closer look at Psalm 8 to understand more about how God chooses to rule his world. (Continue reading the commentary at this link. It’s not long.)

This psalm is about praising God and how praise establishes strongholds against our enemies. When we are upset by something or abused by someone, what is often our first inclination? We want to strike back, to seek revenge, or to cause our adversary damage in some way. (As an example, think about divorce.) That is the way of the world, and we see it going on all around us and in the daily, nonstop 24/7 news cycle. It’s the theme of a lot of movies–to get revenge. Yet the ways of God are exactly the opposite of how the world reacts when our enemies, both seen and unseen, come against us; and how we, as Christians, should react when abuse comes to us through the actions of others.

First, let’s take a look at spiritual strongholds. In an article titled, What does the Bible say about spiritual strongholds,” (author’s name not mentioned) published on CompellingTruth.org, the article states:

A stronghold is defined as “(1) a place that has been fortified so as to protect it against attack; (2) a place where a particular cause or belief is strongly defended or upheld.” Strongholds are designed to be a safe place. As believers in Christ, we need to make the Lord our stronghold. He is our safe place and refuge (Psalm 27:1).

Throughout the Old Testament, God speaks through the prophets about how He will destroy enemy strongholds (Amos 1:71012Hosea 8:14). While these referred to physical strongholds, we can draw metaphorical parallels from them. The word “strongholds” is used metaphorically only one time in the New Testament. In 2 Corinthians 10:3–5, Paul writes: “For though we walk in the flesh, we are not waging war according to the flesh. For the weapons of our warfare are not of the flesh but have divine power to destroy strongholds. We destroy arguments and every lofty opinion raised against the knowledge of God, and take every thought captive to obey Christ.”

 

This passage shows us that spiritual strongholds are arguments, lofty opinions, and thoughts that are raised against the knowledge of God, or, are held in esteem over Him. Strongholds are rooted in pride because they rely on the self. They lead to a prideful heart, unhealthy thought patterns, and habitual sins that we just can’t seem to overcome. Anything that we trust in besides the Lord can become a spiritual stronghold.

Because strongholds are spiritual, our battle to fight them takes place in the spiritual-realm and needs to be fought with spiritual weapons. Ephesians 6:10–18 affirms that the weapons of our warfare are not carnal weapons, but spiritual ones that enable us to stand strong against the Devil’s schemes. These are the weapons God has provided for us: “Stand therefore, having fastened on the belt of truth, and having put on the breastplate of righteousness, and, as shoes for your feet, having put on the readiness given by the gospel of peace. In all circumstances take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming darts of the evil one; and take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God, praying at all times in the Spirit, with all prayer and supplication” (Ephesians 6:14-18a).

If we are wise, we will tear down spiritual strongholds in our lives using these spiritual tools, restoring our full trust in the Lord (Proverbs 21:22). Tearing down strongholds is not easy, and when we begin to fight we will most certainly experience resistance. There can be both carnal and demonic spiritual strongholds in our lives, families, and churches, but Christ’s power enables us to be free from them and also gives us the ability to operate in His power to help others be free from them, too. Instead of depending on ourselves and being in bondage, we can fully place our trust in God and His love for us and make Him the only stronghold we have: “The LORD is my rock and my fortress and my deliverer, my God, my rock, in whom I take refuge, my shield, and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold” (Psalm 18:2; see also Psalm 94:22).

Even though we will experience resistance when we begin destroying spiritual strongholds, we can remain confident that in doing this we are being used by the Lord to build His Church, and He will not allow Satan to triumph in the end (Matthew 16:18). Jesus has already won the war. Psalm 144:1–2 says:

“Blessed be the LORD, my rock, who trains my hands for war, and my fingers for battle; he is my steadfast love and my fortress, my stronghold and my deliverer, my shield and he in whom I take refuge, who subdues peoples under me.”

It’s our responsibility to be warriors for Christ to tear down spiritual strongholds and fight the spiritual battles here on the earth using the weapons God has given us. Though we are in a fierce battle, we can be confident knowing that we are on the winning side. (Quote source here.)

In a post titled, Praise as a Weapon,” by Tracy J. Robbins, wife, mother, teacher and writer, describes one of the most powerful weapons we as Christians have, and that is praise. She writes:

However, I’ve learned that praise will silence the enemy, give us strength and lighten our load, and save us from our enemies. Therefore it’s an effective weapon. We can fight the enemy and even our own negative feelings with praise. Praise creates an atmosphere for the Holy Spirit to work and move and for God to answer prayers.

“Through the praise of children and infants you have established a stronghold against your enemies, to silence the foe and the avenger.” Psalm 8:2 (NIV)

“To console those who mourn in Zion, to give them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness; that they may be called trees of righteousness, the planting of the Lord, that He may be glorified.” Isaiah 61:3 (NKJV)

“I call upon the LORD, who is worthy to be praised, and I am saved from my enemies.” Psalm 18:3 (ESV)

Praise is a weapon that is different from other kinds of weapons

It’s both a spiritual offensive and a defensive weapon. God has given us different kinds of spiritual weapons to use. They are stronger and more powerful than any weapon of this world with which we might do battle. Praise as a weapon might seem unnatural but it IS supernatural.

“The weapons we fight with are not the weapons of the world. On the contrary, they have divine power to demolish strongholds.” 2 Corinthians 10:4 (NIV)

We praise in and by faith

Praising in the middle of a battle DOES seem counterintuitive and contradictory. We praise when it doesn’t make sense to do so because we have faith in the power of God. Praise is a weapon of faith—it’s a fight of faith. We praise in spite of the circumstances surrounding us.

“Faith is the confidence that what we hope for will actually happen; it gives us assurance about things we cannot see.” Hebrews 11:1 (NLT)

“Fight the good fight of the faith. Take hold of the eternal life to which you were called when you made your good confession in the presence of many witnesses.” 1 Timothy 6:12 (NIV)

“Even though the fig trees have no blossoms, and there are no grapes on the vines; even though the olive crop fails, and the fields lie empty and barren; even though the flocks die in the fields, and the cattle barns are empty, yet I will rejoice in the LORD! I will be joyful in the God of my salvation!” Habakkuk 3:17-18 (NLT)

Praise is often a sacrifice and act of surrender

Praise is a weapon to use in spite of our feelings (and our negative feelings are sometimes even overcome with our praise). Because of this sometimes our praise is a sacrifice…because we don’t FEEL like doing it. It will cost us our time and our energy.

“Through Jesus, therefore, let us continually offer to God a sacrifice of praise–the fruit of lips that openly profess his name.” Hebrews 13:15 (NIV)

**Other verses using the phrase “sacrifice of praise”:  Jeremiah 33:11, Psalm 50:14, Psalm 107:22, Psalm 116:17, and Amos 4:5.

Praise invites God into the situation…. (Quote source here.)

At this point, I will direct you to her post at this link, where she describes how praise invites God into the situation; how praise acknowledges that God is greater; and how praise causes the enemy to flee. She also includes stories from the Bible where praise was used as a weapon in the lives of King Jehoshaphat, Paul and Silas, David, and Joshua in the battle of Jericho. She ends her post with some practical steps in using praise as a weapon. (Click here to read her post.)

I’ll admit that whenever I get upset about something, praise usually isn’t the first thing that comes to mind; yet praise is very calming, and it take our mind and focus off of the situation and puts it where it belongs–on God.

I’ll end this post with the words from Psalm 150 (NIV):

Praise the Lord.

Praise God in his sanctuary;
    praise him in his mighty heavens.
Praise him for his acts of power;
    praise him for his surpassing greatness.
Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet,
    praise him with the harp and lyre,
praise him with timbrel and dancing,
    praise him with the strings and pipe,
praise him with the clash of cymbals,
    praise him with resounding cymbals.

Let everything . . .

That has breath . . .

Praise the Lord . . . .

YouTube Video: “Psalm 8 (How Majestic Is Your Name)” by Shane & Shane:

Photo #1 credit here
Photo #2 credit here

For The Good

Romans 8:28-30 (NKJV), written by the Apostle Paul, state the following:

And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose. For whom He foreknew, He also predestined to be conformed to the image of His Son, that He might be the firstborn among many brethren. Moreover whom He predestined, these He also called; whom He called, these He also justified; and whom He justified, these He also glorified.

So what does it mean that all things work together for good to those who love God and who are called according to His purpose? There are a lot of things that are not good that happen in our world and to us. And it’s also a hard question to answer especially if our life resembles a jigsaw puzzle of what seems like “hit or miss” opportunities. For example, take Joseph’s life in the Old Testament. What a jigsaw puzzle his life started out to be at a very young age with some real tragedies, but in the end when he was old, it all came together perfectly according to God’s purposes. In fact, from God’s perspective Joseph’s entire life was mapped out by God before he was even born. Nothing in his life happened by accident.

GotQuestions.org answers that question as follows:

When a Christian utters the phrase all things work together for good, he or she is referring to a portion of one of the most quoted, claimed verses in the New Testament, Romans 8:28: “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.” Or, as the KJV translates it, “And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose.”

God works all things together for good—both His good and our good. As God is glorified, His people benefit.

In Romans 8, Paul contrasts a life lived in selfish pursuits (the flesh) and one lived in league with, or in accordance with, God (the Spirit). He impresses upon readers that our sovereign God is all-knowing, all-wise, and all-powerful.

Those who love God can trust His goodness, His power, and His will to work out all things for our good. We journey together with Him.

The promise that God works all things together for good does not mean that all things, taken by themselves, are good. Some things and events are decidedly bad. But God is able to work them together for good. He sees the big picture; He has a master plan.

Neither does the promise that God works all things together for good mean we will acquire all that we want or desire. Romans 8:28 is about God’s goodness and our confidence that His plan will work out as He sees fit. Since His plan is always good, Christians can take confidence that, no matter our circumstances or environments, God is active and will conclude things according to His good and wise design. With this knowledge we can learn to be content (see Philippians 4:11).

The fact that God works all things together for good means God’s plan will not be thwarted. In fact, we are part of His plan, having been “called according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28). When we trust God and His way, we can be sure that He is active and powerful on our behalf (see Ephesians 3:20).

God knows the future, and His desires will be accomplished. “I make known the end from the beginning, from ancient times, what is still to come. I say, ‘My purpose will stand, and I will do all that I please’” (Isaiah 46:10). Even when things seem chaotic and out of control, God is still in charge. We sometimes worry about what’s happening to us because we do not know what is best for us. But God does.

The principle of God working all things together for good is well illustrated in the Old Testament account of Joseph’s life. Early in Joseph’s life, Joseph’s jealous brothers sold him into slavery. In Egypt, Joseph rises to a position of responsibility. Then, he is unjustly imprisoned and forgotten about by his friends. God gifts him the ability to interpret dreams, and through that ability Joseph is once again raised to a place of honor and power. When drought forces Joseph’s brothers to seek food elsewhere, they travel to Egypt and encounter Joseph, who eventually saves them from starvation and grants them a livelihood in his new land.

Throughout his life, Joseph trusted God no matter his good or bad circumstances. Joseph experienced plenty of bad things: kidnapping, slavery, false accusations, wrongful imprisonment, rejection, and famine. But in the end God brought things to a wonderful, life-affirming conclusion. God blessed Joseph’s entire family through those painful circumstances and through Joseph’s faith. (You can read about Joseph’s life beginning in Genesis 37.)

Paul’s life is another testament to how God works all things together for good. Paul suffered shipwrecks, beatings, imprisonment, murder attempts, temporary blindness, and more—all within God’s plan to spread the gospel (see Acts 9:16 and 2 Corinthians 11:24–27). Through it all, God was steadfastly working to bring about good and glorious results.

After promising that God works all things together for our good, Romans 8 concludes with the wonderful fact that God trumps everything that comes against Him and those who belong to Him. The Christian is assured that nothing can ever separate us from God’s love: “Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall trouble or hardship or persecution or famine or nakedness or danger or sword? . . . No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Romans 8:35–39). God’s love is everlasting, and His wisdom is infinite. It doesn’t matter who or what attempts to thwart God’s plan; no one and nothing can. God will work all things together for the good of those who love Him. Our decision to align our will with God’s and to always trust Him will be rewarded. (Quote source here.)

Those are very encouraging words, so let us take life one day at a time, and give every fabric of our being to God first thing every morning in prayer. God knows all the pieces of our own puzzles (our lives) even when we can’t see the forest for the trees. We are called to have faith and to trust in God, and not to worry about anything (even the jigsaw puzzle pieces of our lives). In Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount, he states the following in Matthew 6:25-34 (NIV):

Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothes? Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they? Can any one of you by worrying add a single hour to your life?

“And why do you worry about clothes? See how the flowers of the field grow. They do not labor or spin. Yet I tell you that not even Solomon in all his splendor was dressed like one of these. If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today and tomorrow is thrown into the fire, will he not much more clothe you—you of little faith? So do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the pagans run after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them. But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.

I’ll end this post with the words from Proverbs 3:5-6: Trust in the Lord with all your heart,
and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways…

Acknowledge Him . . .

And He shall direct . . .

Your paths . . .

YouTube Video: “For The Good” by Riley Clemmons:

Photo #1 credit here
Photo #2 credit here

Our Advocate

Earlier today I published a blog post on my main blog titled, Let Us Pray,” since today, May 5, 2022, is the National Day of Prayer here in America, and it is commemorated by Presidential proclamation every year on the first Thursday in May. You can read that post at this link.

I ended that post with the words written by Paul found in Philippians 4:6-7 (NKJV) which state:

Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God; and the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.

Over the course of the past dozen years, I’ve learned some things about life that I knew nothing about before they occurred, and even then it took a long time to understand the implications–sort of like putting together a jigsaw puzzle. It reminds me of a quote I included on the main page of this blog by A.W. Tozer (1897-1963), pastor, author/editor, and spiritual mentor who was often thought of as a 20th Century “modern day prophet.” Tozer stated: “I rarely know where I am going in my life’s journey but… I look back and see that God has been leading my every step and I did not even know it” (quote source here).

Proverbs 16:9 states: We can make our plans, but the Lord determines our steps.” My own personal plan included working until normal retirement age or longer (which didn’t happen), and there was no way I could have ever foreseen in advance what actually transpired during the past dozen years and where it has led me. Over time I have learned that there is far more going on in this world than we can imagine, and certainly more than we have the ability to control. James 4:13-14 expresses this sentiment:

Now listen, you who say, “Today or tomorrow we will go to this or that city, spend a year there, carry on business and make money.” Why, you do not even know what will happen tomorrow. What is your life? You are a mist that appears for a little while and then vanishes.

When it comes to prayer, there is nothing in this world that is more important then prayer, even when we have no clue what to pray about or how to go about praying for something we aren’t even sure how to pray about. But prayer is talking to God about what is on our heart–all of it–the good, the bad and the ugly; worries, fears, anxiety; the unknown future; why things are happening that we never expected; and the sheer tiredness of waiting. However, as Paul reminds us in Romans 8:26-28 (MSG): “… the moment we get tired in the waiting, God’s Spirit is right alongside helping us along. If we don’t know how or what to pray, it doesn’t matter. He does our praying in and for us, making prayer out of our wordless sighs, our aching groans. He knows us far better than we know ourselves, knows our pregnant condition, and keeps us present before God. That’s why we can be so sure that every detail in our lives of love for God is worked into something good.”

The NIV states Romans 8:26-28 as follows: In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us through wordless groans. And he who searches our hearts knows the mind of the Spirit, because the Spirit intercedes for God’s people in accordance with the will of God. And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.”

In John 14, Jesus is comforting his disciples before his crucifixion and resurrection. In John 14:1, Jesus starts by telling them, “Do not let your hearts be troubled. You believe in God; believe also in me.” Then in verses 15-21 Jesus introduces the Holy Spirit–the Spirit of truth–to his disciples:

If you love me, keep my commands. And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another advocate to help you and be with you forever—the Spirit of truth. The world cannot accept him, because it neither sees him nor knows him. But you know him, for he lives with you and will be in you. I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you. Before long, the world will not see me anymore, but you will see me. Because I live, you also will live. On that day you will realize that I am in my Father, and you are in me, and I am in you. Whoever has my commands and keeps them is the one who loves me. The one who loves me will be loved by my Father, and I too will love them and show myself to them.

And a few verses later, in John 14:25-27, Jesus states:

All this I have spoken while still with you. But the Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you all things and will remind you of everything I have said to you. Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid.

GotQuestions.org gives us a description of the Holy Spirit as our advocate and counselor in answer to the question, “What does it mean that the Holy Spirit is our Paraclete?” (the term Paraclete means advocate, counselor, intercessor, helper):

After Jesus announced to His disciples that He would be leaving them soon, He gave them a statement of great encouragement: “And I will ask the Father, and He will give you another Counselor to be with you forever—the Spirit of Truth” (John 14:16–17).

The Greek word translated “Comforter” or “Counselor” (as found in John 14:162615:26; and 16:7) is “parakletos.” This form of the word is unquestionably passive and properly means “one called to the side of another”; the word carries a secondary notion concerning the purpose of the calling alongside: to counsel or support the one who needs it. This Counselor, or Paraclete, is God the Holy Spirit, the third Person of the Trinity who has been “called to our side.” He is a personal being, and He indwells every believer.

During His earthly ministry, Jesus had guided, guarded, and taught His disciples; but now, in John 14—16, He is preparing to leave them. He promises that the Spirit of God would come to the disciples and dwell in them, taking the place of their Master’s physical presence. Jesus called the Spirit “another Comforter”—another of the same kind. The Spirit of God is not different from the Son of God in essence, for both are God.

During the Old Testament age, the Spirit of God would come on people and then leave them. God’s Spirit departed from King Saul (1 Samuel 16:1418:12). David, when confessing his sin, asked that the Spirit not be taken from him (Psalm 51:11). But when the Spirit was given at Pentecost, He came to God’s people to remain with them forever. We may grieve the Holy Spirit, but He will not leave us. As Jesus said in Matthew 28:20, “Surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” How is He with us when He is in heaven, seated at the right hand of the Father? He is with us by His Spirit (the Helper—the Parakletos).

To have the Holy Spirit as our Paraclete is to have God Himself indwelling us as believers. The Spirit teaches us the Word and guides us into truth. He reminds us of what Jesus has taught so that we can depend on His Word in the difficult times of life. The Spirit works in us to give us His peace (John 14:27), His love (John 15:9–10), and His joy (John 15:11). He comforts our hearts and minds in a troubled world. The power of the indwelling Paraclete gives us the ability to live by the Spirit and “not gratify the desires of the sinful flesh” (Galatians 5:16). The Spirit can then produce His fruit in our lives (Galatians 5:22–23) to the glory of God the Father. What a blessing to have the Holy Spirit in our lives as our Paraclete—our Comforter, our Encourager, our Counselor, and our Advocate! (Quote source here.)

So what is the role of the Holy Spirit in our lives today? GotQuestions.org gives us this answer:

Of all the gifts given to mankind by God, there is none greater than the presence of the Holy Spirit. The Spirit has many functions, roles, and activities. First, He does a work in the hearts of all people everywhere. Jesus told the disciples that He would send the Spirit into the world to “convict the world of guilt in regard to sin and righteousness and judgment” (John 16:7-11). Everyone has a “God consciousness,” whether or not they admit it. The Spirit applies the truths of God to minds of men to convince them by fair and sufficient arguments that they are sinners. Responding to that conviction brings men to salvation.

Once we are saved and belong to God, the Spirit takes up residence in our hearts forever, sealing us with the confirming, certifying, and assuring pledge of our eternal state as His children. Jesus said He would send the Spirit to us to be our Helper, Comforter, and Guide. “And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Counselor to be with you forever” (John 14:16). The Greek word translated here “Counselor” means “one who is called alongside” and has the idea of someone who encourages and exhorts. The Holy Spirit takes up permanent residence in the hearts of believers (Romans 8:91 Corinthians 6:19-2012:13). Jesus gave the Spirit as a “compensation” for His absence, to perform the functions toward us which He would have done if He had remained personally with us.

Among those functions is that of revealer of truth. The Spirit’s presence within us enables us to understand and interpret God’s Word. Jesus told His disciples that “when He, the Spirit of Truth, comes, He will guide you into all truth” (John 16:13). He reveals to our minds the whole counsel of God as it relates to worship, doctrine, and Christian living. He is the ultimate guide, going before, leading the way, removing obstructions, opening the understanding, and making all things plain and clear. He leads in the way we should go in all spiritual things. Without such a guide, we would be apt to fall into error. A crucial part of the truth He reveals is that Jesus is who He said He is (John 15:261 Corinthians 12:3). The Spirit convinces us of Christ’s deity and incarnation, His being the Messiah, His suffering and death, His resurrection and ascension, His exaltation at the right hand of God, and His role as the judge of all. He gives glory to Christ in all things (John 16:14).

Another one of the Holy Spirit’s roles is that of gift-giver. First Corinthians 12 describes the spiritual gifts given to believers in order that we may function as the body of Christ on earth. All these gifts, both great and small, are given by the Spirit so that we may be His ambassadors to the world, showing forth His grace and glorifying Him.

The Spirit also functions as fruit-producer in our lives. When He indwells us, He begins the work of harvesting His fruit in our lives—love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control (Galatians 5:22-23). These are not works of our flesh, which is incapable of producing such fruit, but they are products of the Spirit’s presence in our lives.

The knowledge that the Holy Spirit of God has taken up residence in our lives, that He performs all these miraculous functions, that He dwells with us forever, and that He will never leave or forsake us is cause for great joy and comfort. Thank God for this precious gift—the Holy Spirit and His work in our lives! (Quote source here.)

GotQuestion.org has answers to 75 specific questions on the Holy Spirit including the gifts of the Spirit, and all of those questions and links to the answers are available at this link. It is a great resource for any question you have regarding the Holy Spirit. Do check it out.

I’ll end this post with the words of Paul found in Galatians 5:22-23: But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience/forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control….

Against such things . . .

There is . . .

No law . . . .

YouTube Video: “Spirit Lead Me” by Michael Ketterer & Influence Music:

Photo #1 credit here
Photo #2 credit here